Associate Professor

Office phone: (773) 702-3600
Fax: (773) 702-0886
Office: Green Hall 308

Biography

I earned my undergraduate degree at the University of Michigan in 1976, double majoring in psychology and mathematics. My graduate degrees were also earned at the University of Michigan, an M.A. in statistics in 1979, and a Ph.D. in mathematical psychology in 1984. My graduate advisor liked to define “mathematical psychology” as “the sensitive application of logical rigor to behavioral problems,” and he always emphasized the word “sensitive” when he said it. My training mainly concerned the study of people’s judgment and decision making. I came to the University of Chicago in 1983, and I have been here ever since. From 1991 to the present, I have been an Associate Professor in the Departments of Psychology and Comparative Human Development. In addition, I have served on the Publications Board and on the Board of Directors of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making.

Research Interests

In broad terms, my interests concern aspects of judgment and decision making that emphasize the psychology of preference, uncertainty, and the resolution of conflicting goals. A (somewhat) more specific cluster of interests concerns the way that people manage their activities over time to juggle multiple goals, and the way that people deal with difficulties in the pursuit of their goals. Another area of interest concerns the way that people combine different types of information in determining their preferences, e.g., whether and how people’s expectations about an experience might affect their evaluation of the experience itself.

Selected Publications

Edited Book

Goldstein, W. M., & Hogarth, R. M.  (Eds.).  (1997).  Research on Judgment and Decision Making: Currents, Connections, and Controversies.  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Articles and Chapters

Goldstein, W. M.  (2006).  Introduction to Brunswikian theory and method.  In Alex Kirlik (Ed.), Adaptative Perspectives on Human-Technology Interaction: Methods and Models for Cognitive Engineering and Human-Computer Interaction (pp. 10-24).  Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Goldstein, W. M.  (2004).  Social judgment theory: Applying and extending Brunswik’s probabilistic functionalism.  In Derek J. Koehler and Nigel Harvey (Eds.), Blackwell Handbook of Judgment and Decision Making (pp.37-61).  Oxford: Blackwell.

Goldstein, W. M., Barlas, S., & Beattie, J.  (2001).  Talk about tradeoffs: Judgments of relative importance and contingent decision behavior.  In E. U. Weber, J. Baron, & G. Loomes (Eds.), Conflict and Tradeoffs in Decision Making (pp. 175-204).  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Goldstein, W. M., & Hogarth, R. M.  (1997).  Judgment and decision research: Some historical context.  In W. M. Goldstein & R. M. Hogarth (Eds.), Research on Judgment and Decision Making: Currents, Connections, and Controversies (pp. 3-65).  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Goldstein, W. M., & Weber, E. U.  (1995).  Content and discontent: Indications and implications of domain specificity in preferential decision making.  In J. R. Busemeyer, R. Hastie, & D. L. Medin (Eds.), The Psychology of Learning and Motivation, Volume 32. Decision Making from a Cognitive Perspective (pp. 83-136).  San Diego: Academic Press.  Also reprinted in Goldstein, W. M., & Hogarth, R. M.  (Eds.).  (1997).  Research on Judgment and Decision Making: Currents, Connections, and Controversies (pp. 566-617).  Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Busemeyer, J. R., & Goldstein, W. M.  (1992).  Linking together different measures of preference: A dynamic model of matching derived from decision field theory.  Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 52, 370-396.

Goldstein, W. M., & Busemeyer, J. R.  (1992).  The effect of "irrelevant" variables on decision making: Criterion shifts in preferential choice?  Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 52, 425-454.

Goldstein, W. M., & Mitzel, H. C.  (1992).  The relative importance of relative importance: Inferring other people's preferences from relative importance ratings and previous decisions.  Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 51, 382-415.

Goldstein, W. M.  (1991).  Decomposable threshold models.  Journal of Mathematical Psychology, 35, 64-79.

Goldstein, W. M.  (1990).  Judgments of relative importance in decision making: Global vs. local interpretations of subjective weight.  Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 47, 313-336.

Goldstein, W .M., & Einhorn, H .J.  (1987).  Expression theory and the preference reversal phenomena. Psychological Review, 94, 236-254.

Courses

Undergraduate

  • Introduction to Social Psychology 

Graduate

  • Judgment and Decision Making
  • Processes of Judgment and Decision Making