2020 Earl R. Franklin Fellows

Josselin Martinez is a third year double majoring in psychology and neuroscience. She is pursuing her thesis with Dr. Amanda Woodward in the Infant Learning and Development Laboratory. Her project investigates patterns of help-seeking behaviors demonstrated by infants during problem solving tasks, specifically looking into the influences of executive function skills and sociability in an attempt to understand the factors that play into the development of problem-solving strategies. After graduating in 2021, she plans to pursue a PhD in developmental psychology and work towards the improvement of early childhood education in the U.S.
Eddie Mondeja is a third year double majoring in psychology and comparative human development, with a minor in neuroscience. He is pursuing his thesis with Dr. Alex Shaw at the Developmental Investigations in Behavior and Strategy Lab. His project will investigate how children evaluate reputation management, specifically white lies and poser behaviors. He hopes to start a broader line of study in the development of deception and aggression. Following graduation, he plans to pursue a Ph.D. in developmental psychology and study personality disorders in children.  
Margaret Wolfson is a rising fourth year majoring in psychology and minoring in English. She is pursuing her thesis with Dr. Fan Yang at the Human Nature and Potentials Laboratory. Her project investigates the development of altruistic tendencies in children. Specifically, the research aims to understand how children balance their own needs versus the needs of other individuals and groups. Following graduation, she plans to pursue graduate work in psychology.

2019 Earl R. Franklin Fellows

Tanvi Lakhtakia Tanvi Lakhtakia is a third year studying psychology and neuroscience. She is pursuing her thesis in the Environmental Neuroscience Lab with Dr. Marc Berman, and combine these two fields of study. Her project, investigates how visual attention is affected by the environment, and further studying how certain environments can be restorative to attention and other cognitive functions. After graduating in 2020, she plans to pursue a doctorate in clinical psychology, and hopes to engage in both clinical practice and research.  
Sarah Pan Sarah Pan is a third year double majoring in psychology and neuroscience. She is pursuing her thesis with Dr. Amanda Woodward at the Infant Learning and Development Laboratory. Her project investigates how children learn from active or observational teaching, and the generalizability of learned material under each condition. The research also hopes to explore how parental teaching style may affect children's learning. Following graduation, she plans to pursue a Ph.D. in developmental psychology.  
Mint Poonpatanapricha Mint Poonpatanapricha is a third year majoring in Psychology and a rising BA/MA student in Computational Social Science program. She received the Earl Franklin Fellowship in 2019 to pursue her thesis with Dr. Dario Maestripieri at the Behavioral Biology Lab. Her research investigates the association of psychosocial stress with early relationship formation, with emphasis on individual differences such as gender, personality traits, chronotype, and future mating orientation. In her fourth year, she will start her master program in Computational Social Science, hoping to acquire and master in advance computational skills for her future research in psychology.
Alexandra Tunkei

Alexandra Tunkel is a third year double majoring in Psychology and Biology. She works with Dr. Dan Yurovsky in the Communication and Learning Lab and plans to study the use of negation during referential communication in both adults and children through an interactive iPad game. This research will continue into the school year to serve as her senior thesis. She plans to pursue an M.D. after graduation and hopes to specialize in a pediatric field.

2018 Earl R. Franklin Fellows

Anoushka Chowdhary Anoushka Chowdhary is a third year double majoring in Psychology and Comparative Human Development. She is pursuing her thesis under Dr Alex Shaw in the Developmental Investigations of Behavior & Strategy Lab. Her project explores the development of the ubiquitous, yet unexplored, phenomenon of friendship-masking in children. Understanding the nuances of this behavior would help elucidate the function that it evolved to perform. After graduation she plans to pursue a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology and explore experimental research as a passion.  
Maddie Meyers Maddie Meyers is a third year double majoring in Psychology & Comparative Human Development and minoring in Linguistics. Her research interests include language evolution and how children use social and pragmatic cues to aid the language acquisition process. She received the Earl Franklin Fellowship in 2018 to pursue her thesis with Professor Dan Yurovsky. Her project investigates how parental correction of child language production errors not only helps children learn the language, but also preserves the communication system as a whole. She has been working in the Communication & Learning Lab since her second year, and plans to pursue graduate studies in education or developmental psychology after graduation.  
Mia Radovanovic Mia Radovanovic is a third year majoring in psychology and minoring in statistics. She works with Dr. Amanda Woodward and will study the effectiveness of different teaching styles, particularly independent exploration and observation. This research also hopes to explore how individual differences in children's executive function affect learning from these respective styles. Following graduation, she plans to pursue a Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology.
Katherine Reis

Katherine Reis is a third year double majoring in psychology and neuroscience. She works with Dr. Howard Nusbaum and her research interests include how experience and attention shapes auditory perception. Her research is based how short term expectations drive auditory perception as recorded by electrophysiological equipment. This research also plans to look at how individual differences in experience (i.e. music experience) come to shape human auditory perception as well. Following graduation she plans on pursuing a Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology along with an M.D

2017 Earl R. Franklin Fellows

Sophie Arnold Sophie Arnold is a third year double majoring in psychology and economics. She works with Professor Alex Shaw in the Developmental Investigations of Behavior & Strategy Lab where she is currently working on her thesis. She is interested in which factors affect how children make decisions and her research explores negotiation in children with a focus on whether gender affects how children negotiate. After graduating, she plans on perusing a Ph.D. in developmental psychology.  
Uriel Heller Uriel Heller is a third year majoring in psychology. He received the Earl R. Franklin Fellowship in 2017 to conduct an honors thesis under the guidance of Professors Boaz Keysar and Miwa Yasui. His research will investigate the relationship between multilingualism and attitudes towards mental health as mediated by socio-normative and emotive pathways. In particular, he is motivated by its potential applicability to Asian-American immigrants, a population in which mental health services are highly stigmatized. Uriel has been working in the Keysar Lab since his first year, and plans to pursue graduate studies in clinical psychology.  
Tyler Warner Tyler Warner is a third-year majoring in Psychology. He has assisted Dr. Lindsey Richland in the University of Chicago Learning Lab for two years, where he is currently working on his honors thesis project. It aims to explore how comparative spatial layouts and gesturing interact with the cognitive demands of learning mathematics in the classroom. After graduating, he plans on pursuing a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology.
Marianna Zhang

Marianna Zhang is a third-year majoring in psychology and minoring in philosophy. She is interested in how language and concepts interact in the mind. Her honors thesis is an fMRI study investigating the role of bodily experience in how we understand language about the actions of ourselves and others. She works with Professor Daniel Casasanto at the Experience & Cognition Lab, and plans to pursue a Ph.D. in cognitive or developmental psychology.

2016 Earl R. Franklin Fellows

Xanthe Gallate Xanthe Gallate is a third year majoring in Psychology. She received the Earl R. Franklin Fellowship in 2016 to pursue an honors thesis with Professor Jean Decety. Her research explores how contextual information is incorporated in resource decision making tasks in young children. Xanthe has worked in the Decety Lab since her second year and plans on pursuing a career in gynecology and obstetrics.
Annie Hao Annie Hao is a third year double majoring in Psychology and Philosophy. In her thesis, she aims to explore possible differences in stigma towards mental health treatment between Chinese International and Chinese American young adults –– put in relation with possible differing cultural orientations. Her work is guided by Professor Miwa Yasui and Professor Richard Shweder. Annie works in Prof. Yasui’s lab at the SSA, and assists Dr. David Beiser with testing new depression and suicide screening tools in the Emergency Department. She plans to pursue graduate studies in Clinical Psychology.
Haozhe Shan Haozhe Shan is a rising fourth-year majoring in Psychology and minoring in Computational Neuroscience. He works with Dr. Peggy Mason in the Department of Neurobiology. This summer, his research focuses on a rodent model of social rejection, and the gut microbiota basis of rat social preference. He has worked in the Mason Lab for almost three years and plans to pursue graduate studies in neuroscience after graduation.
Zachary Trail

Zachary Trail is a fourth year double majoring in Psychology and Comparative Human Development. The 2016 Earl R. Franklin Fellowship will support his honors thesis project with Dr. Alex Shaw, which explores children’s understanding of moral hypocrisy and the possible signaling benefits of moral condemnation. Zachary works in Dr. Shaw’s Developmental Investigations of Behavior and Strategy (DIBS) Lab and intends to pursue a career in elementary education.


2015 Earl R. Franklin Fellows


George Abitante George Abitante is a third year double majoring in Psychology and Philosophy. He received the Earl R. Franklin Fellowship in 2015 to pursue his honors thesis research with Prof. Howard Nusbaum. His thesis explores whether acute aerobic exercise affects consolidation of learning in a perceptual learning task. George works in the Nusbaum lab and intends to pursue graduate studies in Clinical Psychology.
Sherry He Sherry He is a third year double majoring in psychology and linguistics. The Earl R. Franklin Fellowship will support her honors thesis project with Professor Susan Levine and with the Thirty Million Words Initiative, an intervention program designed to improve early language input to children. Her thesis will explore how differences in caregiver knowledge can influence the quantity and quality of number- and space-related talk produced by caregivers and children. Sherry currently works at the Thirty Million Words Initiative, and plans on pursuing graduate studies in a field related to language acquisition and education.
Evelina Sterina Evelina Sterina is a third year double majoring in Psychology and Biological Sciences. She received the Earl R. Franklin Fellowship in 2015 to pursue an honors thesis with Professor Brian Prendergast. Her research investigates the neural mechanisms that generate and sustain behavioral ultradian rhythms. Evelina has worked in the Prendergast Lab since the start of her second year and plans to continue her studies in neuroscience after graduation.
Nathan Vasquez Nathan Vasquez is a third year in the college majoring in psychology. The 2015 Earl R. Franklin Fellowship will support his honors thesis research. His research explores the effects of group membership on recall of moral and conventional actions in young children. Nathan has worked in Woodward Lab since 2013 and plans on pursuing graduate studies in experimental psychology.

 

2014 Earl R. Franklin Fellows


Kiehlor Mack Kiehlor Mack is a fourth year double majoring in Psychology and Germanic Studies. The Earl Franklin R. Franklin Fellowship supported his honors thesis research with Prof. Anne Henly. His thesis investigates how using metaphors, rather than merely subserving communication, might be an experience that influences more general cognitive and social psychological processes. Kiehlor currently works with Prof. Henly and plans to pursue graduate studies in experimental psychology.
Leah Malamut Leah Malamut is a fourth year double majoring in Psychology and Biological Sciences. She received the Earl R. Franklin Fellowship in 2014 to work on her honors thesis project with Professor Brian Prendergast. Her research investigates the effects of acute immune stress on the expression of hypothalamic genes regulating reproductive function in female Siberian hamsters. Leah has worked in the Prendergast lab since 2012 and plans to pursue a graduate degree in neuroscience.
Sophie Holtzmann Sophie Holtzmann is a fourth year in the college majoring in Psychology and minoring in Spanish Literature. She received the Earl Franklin Grant in 2014 to pursue an honors thesis with Professor Boaz Keysar. Her thesis topic explores differences in risk aversion during financial decisions for those using a native or acquired language. Sophie works in Keysar and Nusbaum Lab throughout the summer and academic year, and plans on either pursuing graduate education or work in marketing analysis.
Nick Rekenthaler Nick Rekenthaler is a fourth year double majoring in Psychology and Philosophy. He received the Earl R. Franklin Fellowship in 2014 to work on his honor’s thesis project titled Bilingualism, Ambiguity, and Interpretation, exploring the social communicative advantages of bilingualism. He also does research into action understanding with the use of Infant EEG. He began working in the Woodward Lab during his second year and plans to continue his studies in developmental psychology after he graduates.

 

2013 Earl R. Franklin Fellows


Emily Gerdin Emily Gerdin majored in Psychology and minoring in Religious Studies. As an Earl R. Franklin Fellow, Emily worked on an honors thesis in the Development of Social Cognition Lab, under the direction of Katherine Kinzler. Her project explored children’s expectations regarding other people’s food preferences. Specifically, she was interested in learning whether children would moralize food choices (i.e. would children assume that people who make “bad” food choices are also “bad” people?), and whether a person's social group membership (i.e. their ethnicity) would influence children's expectations regarding what that person can or cannot eat. Emily was a research assistant in Dr. Kinzler’s lab for three years and also participated in an REU program at Yale University in 2012, where she worked with Dr. Laurie Santos and Dr. Kristina Olson. Emily graduated in Spring of 2014 and is currently studying in Israel as a Fullbright research fellow investigating how growing up in an area of heightened religious conflict influences how children develop beliefs about social categories .
Anders Hogstrom Anders Hogstrom double-majored in Psychology (with honors) and Comparative Human Development. He received the Earl R. Franklin Fellowship in 2013 to work on his honors project, titled The Sound of Silence: Attention Entrainment to Isochronous and Syncopated Rhythms. Anders worked in Howard Nusbaum's lab for three years; his work has investigated multiple facets of cognition including attention and learning through the lens of music. In addition to music cognition, Anders has also assisted in research on wisdom as well as the analysis of fMRI data.Anders is currently attending a clinical psychology program at the University of Connecticut.
Brent Rappaport Brent Rappaport majored in psychology and received the Earl R. Franklin Fellowship in 2013 to work on an honors thesis studying the effects of social categories on aspects of infants’ social cognition, with graduate student Zoe Liberman in Amanda Woodward’s lab. He joined Professor Woodward’s lab as a research assistant in the fall of 2012 after working in John Cacioppo’s lab and then conducting a study during the summer of 2012 on the development of working memory capacity in 3-8-year-old children with Dr. Melissa Libertus in Lisa Feigenson and Justin Halberda’s lab. He is incredibly thankful for the opportunity to work in such a wonderful lab over the summer and to further explore his research interests in how aspects of and interactions with the social world affect infants’ and children’s understanding of other people.Brent currently working at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) in Bethesda, MD, studying childhood anxiety with Dr. Daniel Pine thanks to a Postbaccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award
Natalie Stepien Natalie Stepien graduated from the University of Chicago in 2014 with a major in psychology (with honors). Her research interest lies in using psychophysical techniques to understand the neural mechanisms of color perception, and particularly how these mechanisms are related to organizing visual information to make sense of the external world. She joined Steven Shevell’s lab as a research assistant in fall 2011. During spring 2012, Natalie worked with Dr. Sarah Elliott on a research project that investigated whether higher order color mechanisms are sensitive to depth. As an Earl Franklin fellow, Natalie is pursuing an honors thesis project, which explores how individuals experience moving objects in the periphery in order to test hypotheses about processes that change how objects are perceived. Natalie is very grateful for the opportunity to work in the Shevell lab with such inspirational scientists and is excited to continue exploring her research interests in the future.Natalie is currently a PhD candidate in the Vision Science Program at University of California, Berkeley.

 

2012 Earl R. Franklin Fellows

Katherine Crain Katherine Crain graduated from the University of Chicago in June 2013 with a major in psychology (with honors) and a minor in philosophy. Katherine was also a member of the varsity swim team, and served as captain in her senior season. In the psychology department, Katherine was a Earl R. Franklin Fellow, and worked with Katherine Kinzler to explore how different messages influence children's food selections and evaluations in an honor's thesis entitled Influencing Children's Food Choices: Message Valence Matters. Katherine is currently a doctoral student at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business studying marketing, with a focus on consumer behavior. Her research is generally concerned with the types of marketing techniques that can influence people to engage in healthy and socially responsible actions. 
Heidi Siegrist

Heidi Siegrist was involved in the labs of Dr. Joshua Correll beginning in January 2011 and Dr. Greg Norman in October 2012. Her honor’s thesis, The Physiological Correlates of Social Cognition, concerned the ways in which respiratory sinus arrhythmia and oxytocin receptors affect implicit racial bias. Heidi is currently a graduate student at the Sewanee School of Letters, a creative writing MFA program.

 
Peter Malonis

Peter Malonis graduated from the University of Chicago in the spring of 2013 with a B.A. in Mathematics and a minor in Computational Neuroscience. From 2010 to 2012, he worked in the lab of Professor Howard Nusbaum, assisting with behavioral experiments on human speech perception. In 2012, Peter received an Earl R. Franklin fellowship to study the perception of talker variability and its relationship to constraints on the brain’s information processing resoureces. He has also worked in the lab of Professor Dan Margoliash, studying songbirds as model organisms to better understand the neural mechanisms of sensorimotor learning. Peter now works full-time in the Margoliash lab and plans on pursuing graduate study in the neurosciences.

Lester Tong

Lester Tong graduated from the University of Chicago in June 2013 with a double major in psychology (with honors) and philosophy. As a psychology honors student, Lester worked with Professor Jean Decety on an honor's thesis entitled Anxiety, Psychophysiology, and Moral Judgment. He worked in Professor Decety's lab from 2010-2013 on a series of studies investigating the neural correlates of moral judgment. Lester is currently working with Professor Ali Hortacsu in the University of Chicago Economics Department. His research interests include the neuroscience of economic and moral decision-making.