Assistant Professor

Office phone: (773) 702-4342
Fax: (773) 702-0886
Office: Green Hall 418

Biography

Jennifer Kubota is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology and The Center for the Study Of Race, Politics, and Culture (CSRPC) at The University of Chicago. Her research explores the social cognitive and neurocognitive processes involved in how we form impressions of others. In examining these basic mechanisms, she bridge social, cognitive, and neuroscience research with decision-making to advance psychological theories, to test the flexibility of impression formation, and to examine the constraints of interventions in producing lasting reductions in social group inequalities. To achieve these goals she utilizes a multi-level approach that includes investigations of hormonal determinants (e.g. cortisol), neural activations (e.g. EEG, fMRI), and behavioral outcomes and decision-making. She previously worked as a postdoctoral fellow at New York University and received her Ph.D. in Social Psychology and Neuroscience at The University of Colorado Boulder. Dr. Kubota’s research has been supported by the National Institutes of Aging, the National Science Foundation, and the Ford Foundation.

Research Interests

  • Social Neuroscience
  • Impression Formation
  • Stereotyping and Prejudice
  • Intergroup decision-making
  • Discrimination interventions

Publications

Kubota, J. T., Mojdehbakhsh, R., Raio, C., Brosch, T., Uleman, J. S., & Phelps, E. A.
(in press). Stressing the person: Legal and everyday person attributions under stress. Biological Psychology.

Kubota, J. T., Li, J., Bar-David, E., Banaji, M. R., & Phelps, E. A. (2013). The price of racial bias: Intergroup negotiations in the Ultimatum Game. Psychological Science, 24, 2498-2504.

Kubota, J. T., Banaji, M. R., & Phelps, E. A. (2012). The neuroscience of race. Nature Neuroscience, 15, 940-948.

Kubota, J. T., & Ito, T. A. (2007). Multiple cues in social perception: The time course of processing race and facial expression. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 43, 738-752.

Amodio, D. M., Kubota, J. T., Harmon-Jones, E., & Devine, P. G. (2006). Alternative mechanism for regulating racial responses according to internal versus external cues. Social, Cognitive, and Affective Neuroscience, 1, 26-36.